FAQ

How To Keep Your Catch Fresh

Take an ice chest with you large enough to hold at least 50 pounds of ice with half of it's volume remaining.
Determine how long you plan to fish. Crushed ice will not last as long as block ice.
Use crushed ice if you are fishing a half day or less. Use block ice if you are fishing more than a half day.
With crushed ice, cover the fish with ice in the ice chest as you catch them.
With block ice, chip off enough ice with an ice pick to cover the fish as you catch them.
With a large thick fish, consider gutting the fish while on the water and getting ice into the stomach cavity. On a hot day, fish will spoil from the backbone out because the cold can't penetrate fast enough.
If you have a long boat ride and drive home, consider taking a box of table salt along with you. Pour and mix the salt in the ice chest with the fish and melting ice. It has the same effect as salt in an ice cream churn and will keep the fish colder.
If you have a large boat with a built in fish box, consider making a salt brine slush with 100 pounds of crushed ice and table salt. This brine will keep fish all day and will actually be act colder than plain ice.

How To Release a Fish

First get the fish boat side! If you use a net, leave the fish in the net and preferably in the water.
If the shank of the hook is showing at the mouth of the fish, use a grasping type hook removal tool or long nose pliers to grasp the shank.
Use the weight of the fish as leverage and quickly push the hook away from the direction of penetration.
With small fish and no net, handle the fish as little as possible, and remove the hook by hand.
Hard-tailed fish, like the mackerel and tuna family can be handled best by the tail.
Allow the fish to rest and recuperate in the water either by holding the tail or leaving it in the net for a couple of minutes.
For fish that come up from deep water with their air bladder in their throat, take along a hypodermic type needle to insert in the bladder to relief the pressure in the bladder before releasing.
Only bring a fish completely in the boat if you plan to keep it.

How To Tie a Wire Leader

Run the leader through the hook or swivel leaving about 8 inches of tag end.
Put a slight bend in the wire at the hook eye.
Bring the tag end and leader end together and across each other above the hook eye.
Leaving a small loop at the hook eye, twist the two ends together in a haywire twist, Both ends must be twisting together, not one end wrapping around the other. Make about three twists.
Now begin a barrel wrap using the tag end to wrap around the leader end. Make at least a half-inch of barrel wraps. You should have at least three inches of tag end wire remaining.
Make a right angle bend in the tag end half way between the end of the wire and the end of the barrel wrap. It should look like a little crank handle on the leader.
Hold the hook, leader, and barrel twist firmly and turn this crank handle back at a right angle against the wrap. The tag end will snap off clean with no protruding wire burr.

How to Use Lures to Catch Squid for Fishing Bait?

The way a squid jig or squid lure works is by imitating the likeness of a prawn right down to the way a prawn swims when it is retreating from danger.

Using a lure to catch a squid starts with learning how to make it swim like a retreating prawn.

When prawns swim normally they swim forward slowly. But when startled they retreat by swimming backwards in short bursts, with a halt in between.

To replicate this action a squid lure or squid jig combines a factor of buoyancy with a counterweight, so you can swim it like a retreating prawn.

The correct swimming action of a prawn retreating is burst, halt, burst halt. The way you replicate this takes advantage of the balance between the slight buoyancy and slight weight of the lure.

You jerk the lure forward a bit with your rod, then let it ‘halt’ then you jerk it forward a bit more, then let it halt…. then you just repeat this swimming action.

The lure does most of the work and you can see how the lure swims, drop it in the water where you can see it right next to the boat or jetty or wherever you are fishing and practice the jerk then halt technique and you can watch it do it’s prawn like retreat.

Swim the Squid Lure like a Prawn Retreating?

The way a squid jig or squid lure works is by imitating the likeness of a prawn right down to the way a prawn swims when it is retreating from danger.

Using a lure to catch a squid starts with learning how to make it swim like a retreating prawn.

When prawns swim normally they swim forward slowly. But when startled they retreat by swimming backwards in short bursts, with a halt in between.

To replicate this action a squid lure or squid jig combines a factor of buoyancy with a counterweight, so you can swim it like a retreating prawn.

The correct swimming action of a prawn retreating is burst, halt, burst halt. The way you replicate this takes advantage of the balance between the slight buoyancy and slight weight of the lure.

You jerk the lure forward a bit with your rod, then let it ‘halt’ then you jerk it forward a bit more, then let it halt…. then you just repeat this swimming action.

The lure does most of the work and you can see how the lure swims, drop it in the water where you can see it right next to the boat or jetty or wherever you are fishing and practice the jerk then halt technique and you can watch it do it’s prawn like retreat.

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